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Old 28th January 2012, 02:44 PM   #121 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

You know that Angry Robot are launching a crime imprint? They don't have an editor in place yet, so they're not accepting submissions, but who knows...?
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Old 28th January 2012, 02:58 PM   #122 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

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For someone like me who is a discovery writer, that initial draft has to be followed by extensive revision, whereas someone else might precede their draft with extensive outlining - either way, start to finish it takes a lot longer than it seems.
I'm glad I'm not the only one who does this.
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Old 28th January 2012, 03:03 PM   #123 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

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You know that Angry Robot are launching a crime imprint? They don't have an editor in place yet, so they're not accepting submissions, but who knows...?
ooh no I didn't - maybe my detectives will find a home lol Just wonder if they want it to be really dark though ? Well it's a few months away from finished.

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I'm glad I'm not the only one who does this.
I generally bin first drafts and rewrite them, because I see a better order to the story. Like with one draft I'll meet Merlin via ghosts in the fourth chapter. To help my character find a time travel machine - he starts banging on the wall of my MCs bedroom in chapter two in the next draft.

The first draft is readable and isn't bad, but I just love the way the story gains depth with a rewrite.
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Old 28th January 2012, 03:20 PM   #124 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

I always treat my first draft as notes. I usually end up changing loads of it.
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Old 28th January 2012, 03:53 PM   #125 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

Always worth hanging on to first drafts, so when you're incredibly famous, and need a bit more cash, you can sell it as a 'how you shouldn't write' kind of thing. I'd love to see some first drafts of books I've read, just to see how much they do change.
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Old 28th January 2012, 04:09 PM   #126 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

I binned the collection of Pukka Pads that made up my first one It was terrible read like a 70s porn movie without the sex.
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Old 28th January 2012, 04:14 PM   #127 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

Somewhere, buried in my garage, is my first attempt from when i was 16, in lovely neat handwriting - before I started scribbling instead...
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Old 28th January 2012, 05:06 PM   #128 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

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Always worth hanging on to first drafts, so when you're incredibly famous, and need a bit more cash, you can sell it as a 'how you shouldn't write' kind of thing. I'd love to see some first drafts of books I've read, just to see how much they do change.
Ye gods, no. I'd rather the world didn't see my terrible juvenilia. I have a box of notebooks that I can't quite bring myself to throw out, but I hope no-one ever reads them...
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Old 28th January 2012, 06:04 PM   #129 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

I've got Nazis in my book and in the first draft I had them saying things like,

'Vill everybody please pay attention. Ve vill not tolerate any disobedience or you vill be shot.'

When John Jarrold edited my book for the first time he nearly had a coronary. He said it was like a comic.

I've still got all my drafts.
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Old 28th January 2012, 06:40 PM   #130 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

And years later, when your books are studied in Creative Writing classes, imagine how valuable those notepads/1st Drafts/scribblings will be to a scholar!!
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Old 28th January 2012, 06:43 PM   #131 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

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And years later, when your books are studied in Creative Writing classes, imagine how valuable those notepads/1st Drafts/scribblings will be to a scholar!!
That is why I know I took the right decision they now being far more useful into whatever they were recycled into
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Old 28th January 2012, 07:22 PM   #132 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

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And years later, when your books are studied in Creative Writing classes, imagine how valuable those notepads/1st Drafts/scribblings will be to a scholar!!
Haha, maybe I could flog'em on Ebay; along with me book of chat up lines. Most of which, went down like the Hindenburgh
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Old 30th January 2012, 10:27 AM   #133 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

Hi Greg,

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When is a writer a writer? I'm afraid it is as simple as when he writes.
The problem with this argument - and I accept it is a popular one - is twofold. Firstly, it isn't how people who aren't trying to write books would define the term- the cultural baggage argument that some of us have been propounding.

Secondly, it renders the term "writer" so vague as to be virtually meaningless. If I sit down and scrawl once upon a time on the back of a shopping list, put my pen down and go to the pub, can I really in all conscience tell my pals at the bar that I am now a writer?

There is a tendency to allow a greater latitude for what one might call "artistic aspirations". You talk about professional qualifications and I agree with you in part, but plenty of jobs require no professional qualifications and yet the titles which pertain to them cannot be said to be something which people can bestow upon themselves when the mood takes them. Milkman. Plasterer. Manager. Farmer. Advertising Executive. Footballer. Literary Agent.

The sad, bald truth (as amply evidenced by most self published work) is that many people who like to term themselves writers produce semi-literate, self indulgent, derivative crap. They are the equivalent of a chap who calls himself a farmer just because he owns a pair of wellingtons and can tell the difference between a sheep and a cow.

However, whilst we would all snigger at the non-farmer for his arrogance, we allow the non-writer to take on the mantle of author for no better reason that they are doing something which proper writers also have to do - putting words on a page. But being a writer is far, far more than just putting words on a page. The experiences of serious self-publishers such as Scarfy or serious proposed self publishers such as Gary underline the distinction.

I can't remember who said it, but there is a splendid quote in which someone said of a book - "this isn't writing - it's typing."

Quote:
I'd ask the question, was JK a writer while she was sitting in that coffee shop writing her first HP books, long before they were published?
Excellent question. I'd say she was an aspiring writer. The "aspiring" qualifies the "writer" without taking anything away from her abilities. It also deals with your other scenarios, methinks.

Quote:
But there's no body of authors sitting out there passing judgement on who is or isn't a writer, and nor should there be.
But there is a body of professionals (publishers, editors, agents etc) who pass de facto judgment on who is or isn't good enough to make the grade.

Regards,

Peter
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Old 30th January 2012, 12:06 PM   #134 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

Hi Peter,

Your assumption seems to rely on the fact that if someone is not writing as a profession then they are not entitled to describe themselves as a writer. I think there's a difference between someone who might describe their job as a writer to someone who might describe themselves as a writer.

I might describe myself as a cyclist. That doesn't mean I get paid for it, or that you'll likely see me in le Tour de France anytime soon. I might describe myself as a guitarist, but I won't be playing the O2. Similarly, someone who regularly trains and plays football might describe themselves as a footballer; not, perhaps, when asked what their job is (unless they are indeed a professional footballer), but perhaps when asked about themselves. The relevance is in the context.

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Firstly, it isn't how people who aren't trying to write books would define the term.
The majority of people outside academia might assume that if you describe yourself as 'doctor', then you must be a medical doctor...

I don't think there's a defined line as to who's a writer and who isn't. Probably somewhere between Peter's shopping list example and someone who devotedly plans, plots, drafts and edits written works. I don't think it really matters. It's all subjective so trying to agree a universal definition is likely to be fruitless - though we could always trust the infallible font of human knowledge: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Writer
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Old 30th January 2012, 12:12 PM   #135 (permalink)
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Re: Published authors and percentage income

For me self publishing would be the option to allow freedom to put books out at my own pace, in the genre that took my fancy and allow me complete freedom to tell the stories I want to write.

Personally though I think of myself as a storyteller using writing as a useful medium. I also enjoy oral stories.

As a reader I now see self published as a positive thing. Using Amazon I can check the first few pages of a lot of books and I have found some really good innovative stories. Moriah Jovan is amazing and Mike Devlin's Smith is fun.

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