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Old 19th November 2010, 04:40 AM   #1 (permalink)
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A British term meaning...

Hi, I didn't know where else to ask this question, so here goes. What is the alternate meaning of the word "sent" in British speak?

It seems from context to be a judgment, or an insult or something. Does anyone know what I'm asking about? Is it spelled that way, or some other way? Thanks.

-SEH
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Old 19th November 2010, 06:36 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

Asssuming you're not confusing sent with scent - perfumery etc.

It's a derivative of the irregular verb 'to send'

Basic form.............................. send
Past form............................... sent
Past participle......................... sent
Third person............................ sends
Present.................................. sending

Examples

"I will send it tomorrow."

"I sent it yesterday."

"I sent her some flowers"

However:-

Quote:
"He was sent to Coventry."
Is not taken literally, although it could be.

Usually it means he was ostracised and nobody spoke to him. No idea where the phrase came from.
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Old 19th November 2010, 09:25 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

As well as the standard "cause something to be transmitted" etc, it means affect with a powerful emotion, but my dictionary suggests that's a US usage also, so presumably you know that one. It might help if you provide the full text/context, SEH, so we Brits can translate it for you.

Just thought, we do have things like "she sent him up" ie she did an imitation of him in order to provoke ridicule, though I can't ever recall hearing it in the simple past tense, it's more usual as "she used to send/is always sending him up". That it?

In any event, it's not a feedback matter (which is designed for feedback about the running of the forums) so I'm moving this to The Lounge.
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Old 19th November 2010, 09:35 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

There is also the archaic phrase, 'Sending down,' a euphemism for expulsion from certain academic institutions.
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Old 19th November 2010, 04:31 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEndIsNigh View Post
Asssuming you're not confusing sent with scent - perfumery etc.

It's a derivative of the irregular verb 'to send'

Basic form.............................. send
Past form............................... sent
Past participle......................... sent
Third person............................ sends
Present.................................. sending

Examples

"I will send it tomorrow."

"I sent it yesterday."

"I sent her some flowers"

However:-



Is not taken literally, although it could be.

Usually it means he was ostracised and nobody spoke to him. No idea where the phrase came from.

Oooh!.... Oooh! Synchronicity at long last!

It's the difference between "You're fired," and "You're sacked!". Apparently, some centuries ago, a craftsman's tools were his own and he would take them from job to job, town to town etc. Now, if he commited a heinous crime, his tools would be cast into the fire, (loss of tools, loss of trade etc) hence "you're fired!" But if he was just got rid of for a lesser crime, he would be sacked ie his tools bundled up in a sack and shown the door. These latter unfortunates would find it almost impossible to get work locally, but Coventry was desperate to establish itself a a centre of commerce and industry and would take these people. Hence, nobody would give you the time of day, but in order to survive, you were sent to Coventry...

Naturally I am believing my good friend Kate, who related this story to me, and reproducing it here without researching it properly... hold on... nope, Wikipedia and Googling say nothing of the kind, but even they don't give a definitive answer. I'll check with Kate...
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Old 19th November 2010, 05:06 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

Someone can also be:

1. Sent packing (i.e. dismissed abruptly; depending on the context, this may involve either a physical or verbal attack). There's an implication of a superior person dealing with an inferior one (in the first's view, that is).

2. Sent mad (i.e. driven insane).
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Old 19th November 2010, 05:41 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ace View Post
There is also the archaic phrase, 'Sending down,' a euphemism for expulsion from certain academic institutions.
It's also an old phrase used when someone is sent to prison - he/she's "sent down" from the dock area, set high in the courtroom, down a set of stairs to the holding cells, and thence off to the gaol...
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Old 19th November 2010, 05:48 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

Of course, without the original context, we may have lost the scent, or even have been sent on a wild goose chase. (If that makes sense.)
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Old 19th November 2010, 05:55 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

Very true, Sensei Bear...

(just my ...)
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Old 19th November 2010, 09:12 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

Thanks.




(Like the person whose been sent packing, should I take a bow...? )
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Old 19th November 2010, 10:11 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

They don't accept tied-up parcels at the post orifice any more, not even bow tied.

You have now to be stuck up before being sent or there is dissent.
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Old 19th November 2010, 10:17 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

By the way, ScrambleEggHead, we're really just marking time until we get something more specific to work with (so that we can help you with your question).








(Just goes to show that I can write a post without intentional puns in it.)
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Old 19th November 2010, 10:29 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

Since that's obviously an improvement, could we have witnessed the beginning of The Ascent of Bear?
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Old 19th November 2010, 10:33 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

Don't get your hopes up, TJ: it was only one sentence.
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Old 20th November 2010, 06:20 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Re: A British term meaning...

I heard a different reason for being 'sent to Coventry' but I've forgotten it now, I just remember it was different. That one sounds plausible enough.

I'd never thought about this subject before. Ace is correct about being 'sent down' from the Dock, but isn't it strange that you can also be 'sent up' from a completely different etymological origin?
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