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Old 16th June 2008, 01:23 AM   #1 (permalink)
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James Branch Cabell

And now we get into yet another of those neglected masters of fantasy I'm so prone to tout.....

In this case, part of the problem may be that Cabell is in general less in favor than he once was. For one thing, he's difficult to classify save as a "humorist", which hardly does the man or his work justice. He certainly didn't write what most people seem to consider fantasy these days, though there's plenty of magic, wonder, and adventure (of sorts) to be found in his books... not to mention that several of them are set in a medieval realm of Cabell's devising, while others deal with the descendants of various characters from that realm. (And, in the final form he gave these, it's certainly a long enough series to satisfy even the most demanding fantasy fan where length of a series is concerned -- being either 18 or 25 volumes, depending on the edition.)

The problem is that Cabell was writing general literature that was strongly tinted with both a love for and a critique of "romance" in the older sense of the term; he wrote about characters who are seldom shining examples, being stuffed full of "human nature"... yet who are nonetheless often given to noble sentiment and quixotic impulses very much in the tradition of the romantic heroes of old. They are often pitiful, sometimes bathetic, and frequently exasperating... yet there is a warm human sympathy to his work, nonetheless. And I can think of no writer save Cabell who would have had the audacity to begin his "Biography of the Life of Manuel" with such a book as Beyond Life, which is a book about books, about writing, about life and the "vital illusions" fostered to maintain (and improve?) life by the demiurge Romance, and which takes the form of (save for a brief bit at the beginning and the end) a monologue by one of the characters. It is truly a tour-de-force in that it both exasperates and illuminates, and says both everything and nothing about the series to which it is, in a very unusual and quite remarkable way the introduction.

But even more than this, Cabell wrote with a wry intelligence and wit, and a quite formidable vocabulary, in a style which is one of the purest and most exquisite in twentieth-century American letters; and with very little concern for anyone's expectations or desires of where this multi-volume play of his went; for he includes pseudo-scholarly essays, verse, fantasy, historical novels (of a sort), contemporary pieces, genuine romances of both the old and modern school, and a staggering importation of figures from myth, legend, and literature of all times and nations; and all delivered with an ironic, comic, yet often heartfelt, tone which is bound to make the whole thoroughly unclassifiable.

Most of the volumes of his "Biography" were published during the first portion of his career, in no particular order, as the works "came to him", so to speak. It was only when putting together his Collected Works that he ordered them and did revision here and there to give them something more of a unified whole -- or, rather, to make the inconsistencies a trifle less glaring, for the thematic (as well as other) connections were there from the beginning, it would seem. As compiled into this set, the volumes are:

I. Beyond Life: Dizain des Démiurges
II. Figures of Earth: A Comedy of Appearances
III. The Silver Stallion: A Comedy of Redemption
IV. Domnei (with The Music from Behind the Moon): Two Comedies of Woman-Worship
V. Chivalry: Dizain des Reines
VI. Jurgen: A Comedy of Justice
VII. The Line of Love: Dizain des Mariages
VIII. The High Place: A Comedy of Disenchantment
IX. Gallantry: Dizain des Fêtes
X. Something About Eve: A Comedy of Fig-Leaves
XI. The Certain Hour: Dizain des Poètes
XII. The Cords of Vanity: A Comedy of Shirking
XIII. From the Hidden Way (with The Jewel Merchants): Dizain and Comedy of Echoes
XIV. The Rivet in Grandfather's Neck: A Comdedy of Limitations
XV. The Eagle's Shadow: A Comedy of Purse-Strings
XVI. The Cream of the Jest (with The Lineage of Lichfield): Two Comedies of Evasion
XVII. Straws and Prayer-Books: Dizain des Diversions
XVIII. Townsend of Lichfield: Dizain des Adieux (which also contains The White Robe, The Way of Ecben, Taboo, and Sonnets from Antan, as well as "other odds and ends")

Cabell was a fantasy-writer who will entertain, infuriate, and make one think (if only to come up with reasons to tell him why he's wrong about so many things). What he most certainly was not was a writer whose fantasy fits at all with the stereotyped limits placed on the field in recent decades. Instead, he is an exemplar of why, when one begins to explore the field, one finds it is something that can never truly be pinned down to any particular type of story, save perhaps the tale of the limits of the human heart and imagination.

One final word: where possible, it is best to combine the final, revised text with the earlier editions' illustrations by Frank C. Papé, who was to Cabell what Sidney H. Sime was to Dunsany; the two were, to use a trite but very apt phrase (given Cabell's oft-mentioned subject) "made for each other"....
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Old 16th June 2008, 02:11 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

Incidentally, for those who would like a tiny taste of Cabell's style and Papé's illustrations, I offer the following:

Opulent Conceits ~ The Art of Frank C. Papé
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Old 16th June 2008, 04:13 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

Good one JD...

I'm still to catch up properly with the Cabell I have, namely All About Eve, Jurgen, Figures Of Earth ad Silver Stallion.

Sounds like something to look forward to anyway.

Have you read most of his work? Which have you not read?
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Old 16th June 2008, 05:58 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

I've read most (though not all) of the "Biography" -- though, as with so many things, it was a very long time ago (more than a quarter century now), so my memory of specifics is rather vague. I've recently begun a rereading of it both to refresh my memory and to pick up those I hadn't been able to find before, and, finally, to read the entire set in the order Cabell intended.

Those I have read are:

I. Beyond Life: Dizain des Démiurges
II. Figures of Earth: A Comedy of Appearances
III. The Silver Stallion: A Comedy of Redemption
IV. Domnei (with The Music from Behind the Moon): Two Comedies of Woman-Worship
VI. Jurgen: A Comedy of Justice
VIII. The High Place: A Comedy of Disenchantment
X. Something About Eve: A Comedy of Fig-Leaves
XI. The Certain Hour: Dizain des Poètes
XIII. From the Hidden Way (though not The Jewel Merchants)
XIV. The Rivet in Grandfather's Neck: A Comedy of Limitations
XVI. The Cream of the Jest (with The Lineage of Lichfield): Two Comedies of Evasion
"The Way of Ecben"

As for his other work... I've read selections here and there, but there's a great deal I have not yet read. And there are things there, I understand, which are related to this set, as well....

I think, as long as you find an extremely urbane and witty use of prose, along with a thought-provoking argument of various issues, and a love of the myths and legends we have created/evolved over the years, enjoyable, then you'll likely find yourself quite taken with Cabell's work....
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Old 17th June 2008, 11:46 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

Wow all those books in the same saga ! Getting the same feeling i got with Moorcock eternal champion stuff :P

Fantasticfiction has chrono order for that saga.

Is there a problem with reading The Silver Stalion first ?

Our library has only it and Jurgen.

I remember you sending me a pm early on my stay here about this author, this thread reminded me that i havent tried him yet.
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Old 18th June 2008, 01:24 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

Several of the novels, at least, stand on their own. I'd say that each of these books will stand on its own, as the overall pattern didn't become established until he'd written several, and those were certainly not in the order they are presented here.

Reading them in any other order should work just fine; it's just that (as you point out, with Moorcock) the themes are developed more readily, and in some cases you can follow the characters from their early to later years, which gives a different impression than reading, say, a later episode in Manuel's life and then reading Figures of Earth, which begins when he is very young. But as Cabell is also dealing with several generations of people here, either way of reading them is open....
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Old 26th June 2008, 07:54 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

Interesting - I've had 'Figures of Earth', Jurgen' and 'The Silver Stallion' for decades (Tandem Fantasy, 1971) and read them twice, but I thought that was all there was!
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Old 26th June 2008, 04:28 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

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Originally Posted by Anthony G Williams View Post
Interesting - I've had 'Figures of Earth', Jurgen' and 'The Silver Stallion' for decades (Tandem Fantasy, 1971) and read them twice, but I thought that was all there was!
That happens a lot with Cabell, since few save older readers in the field seem to have even encountered the name. And even of those books which could strictly be considered "fantasy", there are more even within the Biography. Something About Eve, for instance, was recognized as a fantasy classic even back in REH's day -- he wrote an essay on that one, incidentally, which is rather an interesting piece in itself....
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Old 26th June 2008, 08:47 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

I should say that I have fond recollections of these books, which I aim to read again sometime, and Cabell's brand of fantasy is quite unlike any other. I think anyone seriously interested in fantasy should read at least one of them.
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Old 26th June 2008, 08:58 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

Oh, they're definitely different, all right. At the same time, Cabell was also a considerable influence on writers as divergent as Fritz Leiber and Michael Moorcock (and, possibly, Harlan Ellison as well; certainly Ellison seems to be quite aware of his work)....
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Old 8th April 2014, 05:28 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

While looking up some information on Cabell for a friend here, I ran across this, which says, much more eloquently than I have ever managed it, what it is I find so powerful and appealing about Cabell's work, particularly the "Biography":

Great Science-Fiction & Fantasy Works: James Branch Cabell

Portions of this are culled from Lin Carter's introductions to some of the Ballantine volumes (e.g., The High Place), but there's also a lot of other information there, as well as a rather acute critical assessment....
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Old 12th April 2014, 10:56 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

Quote:
Originally Posted by j. d. worthington View Post
While looking up some information on Cabell for a friend here, I ran across this, which says, much more eloquently than I have ever managed it, what it is I find so powerful and appealing about Cabell's work, particularly the "Biography":

Great Science-Fiction & Fantasy Works: James Branch Cabell

Portions of this are culled from Lin Carter's introductions to some of the Ballantine volumes (e.g., The High Place), but there's also a lot of other information there, as well as a rather acute critical assessment....
The owner of that website used to post on here as Owlcroft. Haven't seen him around here for a long time. If you like Cabell then check out the Kai Lung stories by Ernest Bramah, also discussed in detail on the same website.
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Old 13th April 2014, 05:56 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

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The owner of that website used to post on here as Owlcroft. Haven't seen him around here for a long time. If you like Cabell then check out the Kai Lung stories by Ernest Bramah, also discussed in detail on the same website.

Thanks for the suggestion. I'm aware of (and have read some of) the Kai Lung stories -- wonderful things indeed, and another set which are (sadly) largely forgotten these days.....
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Old 4th July 2014, 01:57 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

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Originally Posted by j. d. worthington View Post
Oh, they're definitely different, all right. At the same time, Cabell was also a considerable influence on writers as divergent as Fritz Leiber and Michael Moorcock (and, possibly, Harlan Ellison as well; certainly Ellison seems to be quite aware of his work)....


I wonder if Terry Pratchett has ever read him?
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Old 5th July 2014, 05:28 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Re: James Branch Cabell

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Originally Posted by BAYLOR View Post
I wonder if Terry Pratchett has ever read him?

I've wondered that myself. I've not read that much of Pratchett's work (not generally that big on humorous sf or fantasy; Cabell is one of the rare exceptions for me, perhaps because he so often has an underlying tragic dimension to his work), but it wouldn't surprise me if he had....
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