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Old 22nd February 2011, 04:40 PM   #436 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

That's a different angle on it.
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Old 22nd February 2011, 06:21 PM   #437 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

**Grips chest in pain**
Arrrgh... puns.. killing me....
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Old 22nd February 2011, 06:26 PM   #438 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

We could be one living organism, after all, we’re made of the same. Star stuff.
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Old 22nd February 2011, 09:39 PM   #439 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by Evelinn View Post
We could be one living organism, after all, we’re made of the same. Star stuff.
I like that idea. I'm fascinated by the idea that many animals do a lot more living in the present than we do, and in different ways. Dogs are mad about establishing exactly who is boss, horses don't go a bundle on half-hearted types, they're all living a different reality. Well I think most humans are but that's another story.
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Old 23rd February 2011, 06:04 AM   #440 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

If we were driven only by instincts, we’d probably be acting more like animals (some do now too) but if we’re all apart of a connected universe, it has to look at itself from different `angles` so it can learn and evolve, perhaps that’s why we’re so diverse.
Maybe we’re sentient because the universe wants to know why it exists? After all, those are the questions we all ask.
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Old 23rd February 2011, 11:54 AM   #441 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

And have been asking for 7000 years: Carnac, Stonehenge, Avebury, which is no time at all in Earth terms, recent, in fact. I agree we're irrepressibly sentient because of the imponderable questions.

We've been going that way for years though coping with 'the life force', or the brain that grew eyes in single cell blobs on the ocean floor. We're all linked. We've got it, the blobs have got it. Yahoo!

It's easier than it used to be to 'grow eyes' though. Even as recently as 1000 AD you'd get your arms and legs lopped off just for giving the impression you were conscious through eye contact, asking difficult questions, or having unjustified ideas. I think that's why we like Sword and Sorcery. It reminds us of the struggle to be sentient in an unthinking world.
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Old 23rd February 2011, 09:49 PM   #442 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ursa major View Post
That's a different angle on it.
Non angli, sed angeli.
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Old 3rd March 2011, 07:40 AM   #443 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

I've heard that static (or 'snow') on a tv screen is--in some sense at least--a lingering indicator of the Big Bang. My questions are-

Is this true?

In what sense?

Can anyone direct me to a web site, or whatever, that I can read up more about it? I had a look at TV static in Wikipedia, but there was no mention of the Big Bang.

Any help much appreciated.
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Old 3rd March 2011, 08:42 AM   #444 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

This page: Can you explain 'the big bang theory?' | Answerbag, says this:
Well red shift is a good start and also if there is a bang there is often an echo. We found this, a thermal "echo" of the big bang called the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. About 1% of the static on your TV is this background radiation if memory serves.
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Old 3rd March 2011, 09:29 AM   #445 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

So some of the TV 'snow' is the whimper.
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Old 4th March 2011, 08:06 AM   #446 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

Thanks, J Riff!

And interesting point, Mr Bear...
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Old 3rd December 2011, 12:36 PM   #447 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

Necro sticky time:

Where does one really start in worldbuilding? I have about a dozen loose concepts (some that contradict each other) that I want to include into the same world. Its based around an Apocalyptic event that "changes" things in a sense that the previous political boundaries no longer apply, and from there it gets weird. (there are fantasy and sci-fi elements all over the place in my concept but its more a sci-fi leaning ideal)

Where should I start, or where would be the best place to look for help on determining what I can keep and what I cant to make it a continual world without too much BS?
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Old 3rd December 2011, 03:37 PM   #448 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

Well, here's the wikipedia page about it, with lots of handy links.

From the sounds of it, I'd begin with fully working out the nature of the 'changes'- how it looks, the 'science' of it etc- for your world to work, I'd say it's vital to have a confident understanding of this anomaly, because that's the part of your world that effects everything else.
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Old 14th December 2011, 01:31 PM   #449 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

Ok, I've spent the last three days reading through this thread (not constantly, but between doing important things like eating, sleeping and pooping) and I have seen some amazing answers from our residents.

I have a few questions of my own.

I noticed someone asked if a planet could orbit a black hole, obviously far enough away to not fall into it, although I think I'm right that all orbits degrade over time, but I'm not sure if this was ever answered. If it is possible, and I don't see why not, would the planet get any kind of heat in the form of Hawking (or other) radiation?

I have seen mocked up pictures of large orbiting bodies as seen from a planet, and I wondered how large a body could look before it is too large. Io would have a very large Jupiter in the sky, but it would be too large as Io is so close that it is affected by the gravity to such an extent that it would be nigh on inhabitable. I understand that a planet could be big but not dense, so I'm guessing the answer will also depend on the mass of the planet, but how realistic are large Suns and planets when viewed from the surface of another planet?

We had a great discussion in a thread ages back about the terminal velocity of water, and for the purposes of a waterfall that starts in ice and ends in steam the best suggestion was ice that was travelling very fast from outside of a planet's atmosphere and heating up on re-entry until the friction with the atmosphere managed to turn it into steam. So how could this work, I have supposed two closely orbiting bodies and one somehow (gravity i guess) takes water from the other, I'm sure the other has to asssit in giving it away, so that it accelerates through space before hitting the atmos of the other planet and becoming the eternal waterfall. the other issue with this is how does the water then flow back to the first planet?

ok, that is all for now. But as I am working on the second draft of my first novel which happens to be a comedy space opera, it involves lots of strange places that will require some scientific justification, I maybe back to ask plenty more.

So for you brain boxes out there, be ready to have your brains boxed
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Old 14th December 2011, 02:44 PM   #450 (permalink)
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Re: On Creating Imaginary Worlds: Science Fiction

A planet could orbit a black hole for umpteen millions of years in perfect stability. It would probably be some considerable distance from it, but this is only because the collapse itself would cause major disruption in its vicinity. There's no physical reason why the orbiting body couldn't pass within a few thousand kilometres of the singularity (tides would be something else. It might have to be as rigid as a ball bearing to prevent slowing due to tidal distortion).

I can't see a convenient way of getting radiant energy in a system like this. Hawking energy, from something massive enough to have a planet orbit it? doubtful. If there is enough matter around to form an accretion disk, with some falling into the hole all the time you might get flashes from near the event horizon as atoms were torn apart, but nothing reliable enough for photosynthesis.

With an elliptical orbit you could generate heat energy from kinetic by the aforementioned tidal effects; certainly this would, over a few billion years, cause the orbit to decay slowly; but there's time there for species to evolve, develop technology and telescopes and become extinct.

To get your ice interchange you're going to need two planets with a common atmosphere (see Forward's "Rocheworld" or Shaw's wooden spaceships), and even then it's going to be hard to develop a weather system that concentrates tons of water at the gravitational null, then lets it drift away in sky icebergs which, as they leave the region between the two major masses start to spiral down (sorry, I can't manage a straight fall) until the ice starts to steam, the steam (being lighter than air) rises and is carried to the flying pole, to freeze onto the block…
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