Science Fiction Fantasy  
Go Back   Science Fiction Fantasy Chronicles: forums > Books and Writing > Authors > Michael Moorcock

Michael Moorcock Elric and friends

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old 22nd March 2007, 04:05 AM   #16 (permalink)
Noise Warrior
 
Urlik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Isle of Wight
Posts: 789
Re: Moorcock work: common threads?

a|one,
the books of Hawkmoon are great and there are a couple of throwaway bits of information in them that bring up interesting concepts about how legends and religions start and how time changes the pronounciation of words and names and may also point towards his political affiliations
Urlik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd March 2007, 07:17 PM   #17 (permalink)
Last of the Windsong Clan
 
Rahl Windsong's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 645
Re: Moorcock work: common threads?

I am currently reading book 7 of the Elric series and my local library has book 8 and The Dreamthief's daughter so I will be reading Moorcock for a while yet. I have found the Elric story very interesting because here is a "hero", but his patron gods are evil or of chaos.

I like the way Elric constantly stuggles with each situation because of the pull of Chaos and Law seem to effect him equally. I like the way the sword controls the man, leaving the man to pick up the pieces after, always providing him with "vitality" but at what cost?

Really enjoying this series, but they (writers) obviously wrote much shorter novels back then!
Rahl Windsong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd March 2007, 10:16 PM   #18 (permalink)
Noise Warrior
 
Urlik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Isle of Wight
Posts: 789
Re: Moorcock work: common threads?

I think a lot of the writer then wrote short stories because most of them got published in magazines and genre collections.
Urlik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2007, 12:32 AM   #19 (permalink)
Moderator
 
j. d. worthington's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,483
Re: Moorcock work: common threads?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urlik View Post
I think a lot of the writer then wrote short stories because most of them got published in magazines and genre collections.
That was indeed a part of it; and with the early (published, not series-chronological) Elric tales, it was certainly a factor. But if you'll look at the majority of books in general, and especially genre publishing ... there simply weren't any of the huge tomes we see today -- at least, not unless they were anthologies gathered from many sources, as with some of Groff Conklin's, or Anthony Boucher's Treasury of Great Science Fiction (2 vols. -- just over 1000 pages), etc.

For one thing, there wasn't much of an audience for long, drawn-out stories at the time. Most genres were considered just relaxation reading, and not to be looked at as literature; so they had to be more brisk in pace to hold the reader's interest. Also, a lot of writers wrote both short stories and novels, and knew how to keep a story to its essentials, instead of the often bloated works we see today (and have seen before in other fields -- the Gothics of the early 19th century come to mind here). "Less is more" was still a good way to work... it whetted the appetite without satiating -- or surfeiting -- it.

They didn't get big advances, so they had to turn out lots of material to put bread on the table. Also, Moorcock has always worked incredibly fast (with rare exceptions such as the Pyat books), sometimes turning out several novels within a handful of months. (The Michael Kane books, as I recall Justin Leiber remarking, he turned out in one week -- all three in one week, that is.)

Sf, especially, was still predominately an adventure-story genre; the meatier, thought-pieces, such as Earth Abides, being the exception, rather than the rule. That sort of book can seldom really be maintained over a long stretch without becoming very attenuated or repetitious.

And, frankly, the majority of his fantasy, Moorcock wrote as a way to support what he considered his more serious work with New Worlds, the New Wave movement, etc., as the magazine was always teetering on the brink of dissolution financially, and he did most of the supporting of it through his own writing -- which meant a lot done at a fast pace (hence some of the awkward wonkiness and serious slips now and again). This didn't prevent him from addressing his more serious concerns in the fantasy, and still producing some very good fantasy along the way... but it was written hastily and with little revision, hence is sometimes rather jumbled -- and always short (until well into the 1980s, at least, for the fantasy).
j. d. worthington is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2007, 08:10 PM   #20 (permalink)
Noise Warrior
 
Urlik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Isle of Wight
Posts: 789
Re: Moorcock work: common threads?

I'm reminded of Heinlein's short stories and collections and how brief 4 page stories get picked up on later to be included in lengthier works and inter-related stories (Andrew "Libby" Jackson Long's first appearance in a short story added at the end of Revolt in 2010, Methusela's Children, Time Enough For Love and Number of the Beast for example)
Urlik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2007, 10:57 PM   #21 (permalink)
Moderator
 
j. d. worthington's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,483
Re: Moorcock work: common threads?

Um, yes. That was a common practice with a lot of things, too. What began as a short story (or novelette) was often "expanded" later on into novels. Part of that was that serialization was so popular at the time... and readers' responses sometimes altered the way a long serial developed, for that matter. Or stories that were later combined into an episodic novel (Simak's City, Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles, etc.) Or -- specifically speaking of Moorcock -- "The Jade Man's Eyes" being the first of the stories written, then "Voyage on a Dark Ship" (a retelling from Elric's point of view of an episode from a Hawkmoon novel), and finally a third novelette between, became The Sailor on the Seas of Fate, where "Dark Ship" became the first section, the last tale the second, and then he heavily revised "The Jade Man's Eyes" for the third... giving the ending entirely different implications in the process....
j. d. worthington is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th March 2007, 09:03 PM   #22 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Who's Wee Dug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Stirlingshire
Posts: 653
Re: Moorcock work: common threads?

I must admit he is one of my most favorite Authors,I have more of MM's books than any other Author in my collection of about 2000 books.

Did get a rather informative book by Jeff Gardiner published by The British Fantasy Society in 2002.
Who's Wee Dug is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.